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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Highlights Front Roll

IPEN 2016 Global Meeting & Toxics-Free Future Forum
Environmentalists raise alarm over chemicals in Lake Naivasha
IPEN's Perspectives on SAICM Beyond 2020
New IPEN Video: Introduction to the Dioxin Toolkit

The Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) is the only international agreement that addresses the full range of known and newly discovered health and environmental concerns associated with the production and use of chemicals. The 2006 decision that established SAICM expires in 2020 and now there is a global process to determine what comes next. IPEN and Pesticide Action Network collaborated to produce a series of documents that highlight civil society views on key topics for the Beyond 2020 process. The papers describe SAICM’s importance, how chemical safety can contribute to sustainable development, and how actions should be financed. In addition, the papers deal with the relationship between women and chemical safety, how the industry should reduce and eliminate hazard through design, and the connection between human rights and chemical safety.

Kathmandu, Nepal: On behalf of entire children of Nepal, Center for Public Health and Environmental Development (CEPHED) would like to wholeheartedly thanks and welcome the Government of Nepal`s Child Friendly, Health and Environment friendly decision of enacting Toys Standard through publishing a gazette notification today ensuring the Right to Play Safe and Healthy of children, one third of total population of Nepal.

In December, IPEN held an African Sub-Regional Meeting in order to foster relationships among IPEN Participating Organizations (POs) in the region; learn from each other by sharing skills, experiences, and best practices; expand knowledge about international chemical policy developments; and update POs in the region on the IPEN 2020 goals.

IPEN Co-Chair Olga Speranskaya introducing a group of colleagues who will speak on the relationship between human rights and toxic chemicals.

More than 120 environmental, health, and human rights leaders from 55 countries gathered in San Francisco for the 2016 IPEN Global Meeting and Toxics-Free Future Forum to make the collaborative movement for a toxics-free future broader and stronger. The two-part meeting and forum addressed IPEN's 2020 strategy, global policy updates, skill sharing, capacity-building, networking, and movement building to reduce toxic chemicals.

Global meeting topics centered around IPEN’s 5-year 2020 Plan, and ranged from global chemical policy to specific on-the-ground efforts to eliminate mercury, lead paint and highly hazardous pesticides, to skill-building strategies for more effective communications and resource mobilization. Scientific experts from the Endocrine Society and partners from the Project TENDR (Targeting Environmental Neurodevelopmental Risks) also presented their findings on the impact of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and neurotoxicants on human health.

"IPEN was fortunate to develop a cooperation with the Goldman Environmental Foundation, and convene the IPEN Global Meeting in San Francisco, as several IPEN participating organizations are recipients of the Goldman Environmental Prize," note Olga Speranskaya, IPEN co-chair and 2009 Goldman Prize recipient. "As a result, we were able to introduce our partners to new opportunities to advance their work in their communities and globally. This support and solidarity with those who struggle for clean environment, safer and better life for all is crucial to sustain our work."

IPEN Co-Chairs Pamela Miller and Olga Speranskaya sign a statement in support of workers and former workers of Samsung at the IPEN 2016 Global Meeting & Toxics-Free Future Forum

November 18, 2016: An Open International Declaration To the Board of the Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.--   A Call for Justice and Human Rights for the Workers, Former Workers and Their Families

Issued from the Global Meeting of IPEN—San Francisco, California USA

English / Español

IPEN is a global network of more than 500 public interest non-governmental organizations (NGOs) working in 116 countries to establish and implement safe chemicals policies and practices that protect human health and the environment. This week, 120 of IPEN’s environmental, health and human rights leaders from 55 countries are meeting in San Francisco, California in the U.S. for a Global Meeting and Toxics-Free Future Forum (14-18 November 2016). During this meeting, we have had the opportunity to hear first-hand accounts of the ruthless treatment and negligence perpetrated by Samsung against its workers. We are outraged by Samsung’s illegal tactics that include brutal and unsafe working conditions, toxic exposures, physical and mental harassment, use of child labor, wiretapping, bribery, and thwarting of unionization. These unconscionable actions violate the fundamental human rights, health, and dignity of the workers and their families.

While the world is celebrating the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action, the European Commission (EC) is being challenged on its recent decision to authorize Dominion Colour Corporation to supply red and yellow lead chromate pigments for use in the EU in so-called industrial paint.

Lead chromates are composed of lead, a neurotoxin which harms the nervous system, and chromium, a carcinogen causing lung tumours. Children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure and the health effects are generally irreversible and have a lifelong impact. Lead chromates are also extremely toxic to aquatic life. The use of these toxic paint components has been abandoned for decades in many EU countries and many paint companies have publicly stated that safer alternatives do exist and that they have been using them for years.  

(Gothenburg, Sweden) Many decorative paints sold in over 40  low- and middle income countries contained dangerous levels of lead, sometimes in direct violation of national regulation, according to a new report released by IPEN today. The report, Global Lead Paint Report, brings together data from paint studies conducted since 2009 in 46  low- and middle-income countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America and Eastern Europe.

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