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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Highlights Front Roll

New Global Mercury in Women Study
Ukraine Bans Asbestos
IPEN Mercury Monitoring of Cosmetics at COP1
Some Paints in Tanzania Still Contain High Lead Levels
NGO Practical Guide on Chemicals in Products
Elite Paint First Lead Safe Paint® Manufacturer in Bangladesh

Dr. Emma Anakhasyan from NGO Armenian Women for Health and Healthy Environment speaking during a side event on "Emerging Environmental Health Challenges in the UNECE Region."

IPEN and Participating Organization (PO) representatives from Armenian Women for Health and Healthy Environment (Armenia), Greenwomen (Kazakhstan), Independent Ecological Expertise (Kyrgyzstan), Eco-Accord (Russia), Volgograd Ecopress (Russia) and others participated in the recent 8th Environment for Europe Ministerial Conference in Batumi, Georgia (8 - 10 June, 2016). The theme of this year’s Conference was “Greener, Cleaner, Smarter,” and much of its content focused on a green economy. See detailed information here.

Pamela Miller

IPEN is pleased to confirm that the IPEN General Assembly has formally endorsed Ms. Pamela Miller as the next IPEN Co-Chair.

Pamela has a long history of organizing experience, including her role as the Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics, contributor to IPEN’s POPRC and Stockholm Convention COP policy work, and organizer with Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic.

Lee Bell, Imogen Ingram and Jindrich Petrlik at the OEWG- 10

IPEN representatives are currently attending the 10th Basel Convention Open-Ended Working Group meeting (OEWG-10) in Nairobi, Kenya. A range of issues are being discussed, including Low POPs Content Values for POPs waste, which is a critical issue for preventing the spread of POPs into consumer products and the environment.

Dr. Joseph DiGangi

IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor Joseph DiGangi, PhD, participated in a side event at the 2nd United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA2) currently underway in Kenya. Advancing Sustainable Chemistry in a Sustainable Development Context: Opportunities for Global, Regional and National Chemicals Management sought to discuss the sustainable chemistry concept and related opportunities from developing countries’ perspectives; examine the potential of sustainable chemistry in a SAICM beyond-2020 and 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda context; provide an update on recent international developments and discussions related to sustainable chemistry and the chemicals and waste dimensions of the Sustainable Development Goals; and showcase specific initiatives to advance sustainable chemistry, including related policy analysis and technical support.

For more information about IPEN's activities at UNEA2, see this IPEN webpage. 

(Taipei City, Taiwan) More than sixty percent of paints analyzed in a new study on total lead in solvent-based decorative paints contained high lead levels, and at least one paint from all eight brands analyzed contained exceedingly high lead levels. The findings are included in a report released today by Taiwan Watch Institute and IPEN. Moreover, most paint can labels failed to carry consumer information about lead content.

“The health impacts of lead exposure on young children’s brains are lifelong, irreversible and untreatable,” said Xavier Sun, Researcher, Taiwan Watch Institute. “We are limiting our children and our nation’s future intellectual development even though safe and effective alternatives are already in use and widely available in Taiwan. We must reduce this critical source of lead exposure to young children.”

During the course of the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia Regional Workshop on the Establishment of Legal Limits on Lead in Paint (co-hosted by the Government of the Republic of Moldova and the United Nations Environment Programme), which took place 19-20 May, 2016 in Chișinău, Republic of Moldova, IPEN Co-Chair Dr. Olga Speranskaya was interviewed for the Moldovan television program "Publika": http://ru.publika.md/emisiuni/den-za-dnyom_791.html?video_id=2885431

Annual Worldwide Lead Exposure Costs are 7 Times the Amount Low- and Middle-Income Countries Receive in Development Assistance

(Nairobi, Kenya) Worldwide, the annual costs of lead exposure are $977 billion international dollars, with developing countries bearing the great majority of costs, according to research and a new interactive map released today that shows country-by-country costs. Overall, the costs of lead exposure are 7 times the amount of funding provided to developing countries in development aid in 2014.[i]

Economic Costs of Childhood Lead Exposure in Low-and Middle-Income Countries was developed by New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (NYU) and released today at the 2nd United Nations Environment Assembly meeting held in Nairobi, Kenya. The website can be accessed at: http://nyulmc.org/pediatricleadexposure. The map was created to help governments see the costs of lead exposure in their own countries; compare those costs with other countries; and compare costs with the amount of development assistance their country receives.

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