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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Highlights Front Roll

NEW STUDY Mercury Harming Economic Growth
IPEN at the Basel-Rotterdam-Stockholm Conferences of the Parties
Stories from the Clean Room
Toxic Recycling Must End
Critical Milestone in 10-Year Battle: Agreed Policy Framework on Samsung

IPEN Participating Organizations PAN- Ethiopia; CREPD- Cameroon; CJGEA- Kenya; and AGENDA- Tanzania have jointly issued a press release with Oeko-Institut on the health and environmental hazards facing many Africans from recovery of lead from waste batteries, the practice commonly referred to as Used Lead Acid Battery (ULAB) recycling. Partners in four African countries and Germany made a study on the recycling practices involved, which was found to cause fatal lead poisoning to the workers in the recycling facilities and surrounding communities:

Freiburg/Berlin: When the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA) meets in Nairobi on Monday, its agenda will include one of the new and major health and environmental hazards facing many African countries today: the recovery of lead from waste batteries. In sub-Saharan countries, in particular, unsound recycling practices cause severe and even fatal lead poisoning of the people working in and living around small and industrial-scale lead smelters, including children. This is just one of the findings of the broad cooperation project initiated by Oeko-Institut that involved African environmental organisations in Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania.

IPEN Participating Organization National Toxics Network (NTN) has just released a new report, "Contaminants in Marine Plastic Pollution, the new toxic time- bomb."

The United Nations Environment Programme called marine plastics the “new toxic time- bomb.” Marine plastic is not only entangling and drowning wildlife, it is being mistaken for food and ingested along with its toxic contaminants. Marine plastics, and, in particular microplastics, provide a global transport medium for the most toxic chemicals into the marine food chain and ultimately, to humans.

IPEN supports the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal in its efforts to petition the U.S. White House to uphold international law and stop shielding Dow Chemical from accountability for corporate crimes in Bhopal, India. 

On December 3rd, 1984, in the middle of the night, thousands of people were gassed to death because of a catastrophic chemical leak at the Union Carbide pesticide plant in Bhopal, India. More than 150,000 people were left severely disabled, and 22,000 people have since died of their injuries.  For these reasons the Bhopal gas disaster is widely acknowledged as the world's worst-ever industrial disaster. Find out more about the tragedy on the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal's website.

IPEN endorses a new campaign by Participating Organizations Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL) and Health and Environment Alliance (HEAL) that aims to ensure that European Union - United States trade talks do not undermine EU chemicals legislation.
 
The United States and European Union are negotiating a new trade agreement called the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP). This agreement is a threat to the EU’s ability to protect people from toxic chemical exposure.
 

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(Geneva) – In today’s Declaration on Waste Containing Nanomaterials, the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), ECOS, and the Oeko-Institut emphasize the importance of adopting and implementing preventive measures to protect people and the environment from possible hazards of manufactured nanomaterials (MNMs) in waste streams. With the toxicity of nanomaterials still largely unknown, a tight control of waste containing MNMs is crucial.

IPEN Participating Organization Ecological Alert and Recovery-Thailand (EARTH) recently organized a seminar entitled "Good Governance in Sustainable Waste Management: the case of Chiang Rak Yai Waste-to-Energy Project" in collaboration with Puey Ungphakorn School of Development Studies and the Faculty of Sociology and Anthropology.

We, Co-Chairs of the global NGO network of IPEN, express our deep concern over human injustice happening around the world. Too often violent conflicts over natural resources target environmental activists for harm. These conflicts include land grabbing, illegal logging, devastating mining, overuse and contamination of water resources, international investments violating local laws, and many other activities with the potential to irreversibly change the life of people and communities. 

Two murders happened in Honduras in March this year, taking the lives of two amazing individuals fighting for the rights of indigenous peoples to live in a protected and healthy environment. 

On March 2nd, Berta Cáceres, one of the leading indigenous activists in Honduras, a coordinator of the organisation COPINH and a Goldman 2015 Prize Winner, was assassinated in her hometown of La Esperanza, Honduras. Berta won the Goldman Prize in 2015 for her successful fight against the world’s largest dam builder, and in defense of the rights of indigenous peoples of Honduras. Her powerful speech at the Goldman Prize ceremony inspires us all. 

Two weeks later Nelson García, another member of COPINH, was murdered when he helped a group of poor families resist a land grab in the small town of Rio Lindo in Honduras. Both murders happened as a result of the violation of the right of free speech for activists defending the livelihoods of people. 

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