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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Incineration

This new report was prepared by IPEN to address a major source of POPs contamination of the environment that is often overlooked, underestimated or incorrectly classified in risk assessments, exposure scenarios and regulatory controls on waste. Ash and other residues from waste incineration contain dioxins, furans (PCDD/Fs) and a range of other highly toxic POPs at levels which are a threat to human health and the environment. Current management practices and regulatory threshold levels for POPs that contaminate incinerator residues are not preventing releases of POPs into agricultural settings, the food chain and the broader environment.

Please see a 2-page Brief for Stockholm Convention COP 8 Delegates about this report here: Waste Incinerator Ash Poisons the Food Chain

This video is an introduction to the United Nations Environment Programme's Dioxin Toolkit (2013). It offers a brief history of the Toolkit, including its relationship to the Stockholm Convention, and a step-by-step search of the Toolkit for information on identifying sources of dioxins and other unintentional POPs addressed by the Convention.

IPEN has joined NGOs and colleagues in an open letter to the Ocean Conservancy about its report “Stemming the Tide.” The report promotes incineration in Asia as a supposed "solution" to the problem of ocean plastics.

IPEN representatives Lee Bell and Fernando Bejarano were invited by the Brazilian Ministry of the Environment to participate in a two-day seminar on the treatment of PCBs and other POPs. Mr. Bell gave a presentation on behalf of IPEN on the latest developments in non-combustion technologies for POPs treatment.

http://www.ecns.cn/cns-wire/2015/05-28/167184.shtml

(ECNS) - A non-governmental organization (NGO) report has revealed that 121 waste incineration plants in China have refused to disclose data on their pollution emissions, especially the whereabouts of fly ash, according to caixin.com on Wednesday.

The report suggests that fly ash, which originates from the burning of household rubbish, is not fully understood and could be more damaging than was previously thought.

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