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Lead

Advocates call for limit on lead content in paint

HEAVY METAL:Studies have linked attention deficit disorder and lower intelligence to exposure to heavy metals, such as lead, environmental campaigners said

By Chen Wei-han  /  Staff reporter

http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2016/05/24/2003647015

(Taipei City, Taiwan) More than sixty percent of paints analyzed in a new study on total lead in solvent-based decorative paints contained high lead levels, and at least one paint from all eight brands analyzed contained exceedingly high lead levels. The findings are included in a report released today by Taiwan Watch Institute and IPEN. Moreover, most paint can labels failed to carry consumer information about lead content.

“The health impacts of lead exposure on young children’s brains are lifelong, irreversible and untreatable,” said Xavier Sun, Researcher, Taiwan Watch Institute. “We are limiting our children and our nation’s future intellectual development even though safe and effective alternatives are already in use and widely available in Taiwan. We must reduce this critical source of lead exposure to young children.”

Annual Worldwide Lead Exposure Costs are 7 Times Amount Low- and Middle-Income Countries Receive in Development Assistance
http://www.balifokus.asia/#!PRESS-RELEASE-Lead-Exposure-Costs-Indonesia-...

During the course of the Central and Eastern Europe and Central Asia Regional Workshop on the Establishment of Legal Limits on Lead in Paint (co-hosted by the Government of the Republic of Moldova and the United Nations Environment Programme), which took place 19-20 May, 2016 in Chișinău, Republic of Moldova, IPEN Co-Chair Dr. Olga Speranskaya was interviewed for the Moldovan television program "Publika": http://ru.publika.md/emisiuni/den-za-dnyom_791.html?video_id=2885431

Annual Worldwide Lead Exposure Costs are 7 Times the Amount Low- and Middle-Income Countries Receive in Development Assistance

(Nairobi, Kenya) Worldwide, the annual costs of lead exposure are $977 billion international dollars, with developing countries bearing the great majority of costs, according to research and a new interactive map released today that shows country-by-country costs. Overall, the costs of lead exposure are 7 times the amount of funding provided to developing countries in development aid in 2014.[i]

Economic Costs of Childhood Lead Exposure in Low-and Middle-Income Countries was developed by New York University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics (NYU) and released today at the 2nd United Nations Environment Assembly meeting held in Nairobi, Kenya. The website can be accessed at: http://nyulmc.org/pediatricleadexposure. The map was created to help governments see the costs of lead exposure in their own countries; compare those costs with other countries; and compare costs with the amount of development assistance their country receives.

العربية / English / español / русский / français

In the run-up to the 2nd United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA2), which will take place 23 - 27 May, 2016 in Nairobi, Kenya, IPEN has released its Views of Selected Issues at UNEA2. This document is a summary statement of some IPEN views about issues that will be taken up at the UNEA2, including: stakeholder engagement, sound management of chemicals and wastes, lead and cadmium, lead battery recycling, sustainable consumption and production, and marine plastic debris and micro plastics.

This document and additional information about IPEN's activities at UNEA2 can be found on this IPEN webpage. 

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