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A Toxics-Free Future

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Kenya

Phyllis Omido walks through the village of Owino Uhuru. She has been keeping a close eye on the lead exposure that has plagued this settlement since a nearby smelter began operations in 2007.

https://edition.cnn.com/2020/07/17/africa/kenya-pollution-ruling/index.h...

By Bukola Adebayo, CNN

A Kenyan community whose children and residents were sickened by lead from a battery smelting plant has been awarded $12 million (1.3 billion Kenyan shillings) following a civil lawsuit.

Report shows paints being sold in Kenya in 2017 had dangerously high amounts of lead

From March 11-15, IPEN participated in the fourth session of the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA4) in Nairobi, Kenya from March 11th-15th. The meeting addressed the theme, 'Innovative Solutions for Environmental Challenges and Sustainable Consuption and Production."

For information about IPEN's activities, and for resources related to topics covered, click HERE. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=8&v=Y55OPHSEdWE

For tens of thousands of people in Western Kenya, gold mining is a way of making a living.

On informal mines across the region, women use mercury to bring out the gold. But a recent study conducted by a network of international charities has found that the chemical could be slowly killing them - and affecting the wider community.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/04/20/africa/cost-activism-kenya/index.html

By Deborah Bloom, Special to CNN

 

Mombasa, Kenya (CNN)On a hot afternoon at a sprawling settlement on the outskirts of Mombasa, Phyllis Omido makes her rounds.

 

For close to a decade, Omido has been visiting the Owino Uhuru village, monitoring the various illnesses, deaths, and miscarriages that have occurred since a nearby smelter contaminated the village's air and water with lead.

 

NYATIKE, Kenya (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Scorching sun beats down on half a dozen women as they carry large sacks of crushed ore on their backs at the Osiri-Matanda gold mine near Kenya’s border with Tanzania.

On wooden tables, they sieve the powdered ore into metal pans, add mercury, and heat the mixture over a charcoal fire. The air fills with fumes as the liquid metal evaporates - leaving behind a lump of gold. 

https://qz.com/1231792/a-battery-recycling-plant-owned-by-indian-businessmen-caused-a-lead-poisoning-crisis-in-kenya/

Quartz

Zoe Schlanger

 

There is the kind of lead poisoning that creeps into water supplies, builds up in children’s blood streams, and, if sustained, will impair their brains. And then there is the kind, much rarer, that makes fully grown adults drop dead.

 

https://www.economist.com/news/international/21737253-paint-laced-lead-lingers-rich-countries-and-still-being-manufactured-poor

Paint laced with lead lingers in rich countries and is still being manufactured in poor ones.

WRITTEN BY: Benson Rioba

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