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A Toxics-Free Future

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Highlights Front Roll

Deadly Gas Leak in India: LG Chemical Fully Responsible, Fully Liable
New Study Proves Dioxins in Plastic Toys Harm Children
Study Finds School Erasers Contain Toxics
Frontline Plastic Wars Reveals Industry Lies About Recycling
IPENers Gather for a Successful 2020 Global Meeting and Forum
New Report from Toxics Link- Single Use Plastic: The Last Straw

EcoWaste Coalition and Greenpeace Philippines have released a new report "Waste Trade in the Philippines: How Local and Global Policy Instruments Can Stop the Tide of Foreign Waste Dumping in the Country". The report investigates the laws, the policies, and the shortfalls that have allowed illegal waste into the Philippines and also "legal" waste for which the country lacks an infrastructure capable of protecting the health of people and the environment.

Dr. Tadesse Amera, IPEN Co-Chair, welcoming participants to the meeting. To his left are Pamela Miller, IPEN-Co-Chair, and Björn Beeler, IPEN International Coordinator.

IPEN’s 2020 Global Meeting and Forum on Chemicals and Waste took place in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, from the 6th – 10th of February. More than 100 environmental, health and human rights leaders from over 50 countries came together to share the work they do locally and globally to ensure a just and healthy future for everyone by eliminating harm to human health and the environment from toxic chemicals.

IPEN’s new short video about women and chemicals honors many of the women environmental health scientists and advocates dedicated to a world in which toxic chemicals are no longer produced or used in ways that harm human health and the environment. The video makes the case that attention to the differential impacts of toxic substances on women and girls as well as the differential exposure risks is fundamental to effective and sound management of chemicals and waste. Please watch and share.

 

Alarming levels of some of the most toxic chemicals, including brominated dioxins and brominated flame retardants, were found in consumer products made of recycled plastics sold in Argentina, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, the EU, India, Japan and Nigeria.

https://medium.com/@ToxicsFree/to-clean-up-canadas-recycling-act-end-a-z...

Giving hazardous material to children to play with, we can agree, is a terrible idea. But the Canadian government, by allowing some of the most toxic chemicals in the world to be included in recycling, has done just that. Dangerous flame-retardant chemicals, which have been banned globally, can be found in children’s toys and home products that are made of recycled plastics because of one bad policy.

by Faye Leone, Content Editor, SDGs and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (US)

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NGOs in five countries studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network, and found lead levels as high as 100,000 ppm in the equipment paint.
  • The recommended limit by UNEP is 90 ppm.
  • IPEN is calling for lead paint bans to include industrial paint on outdoor equipment, not only decorative paint, to protect children's health.

Children’s playgrounds in Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines and Thailand commonly contain painted equipment with lead levels above 90 ppm, the recommended limit by UN Environment Program (UNEP). Organizations in each country studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), a group of NGOs working to prevent toxic chemicals from harming human health and the environment.

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A new film starring Johnny Depp, "Minamata", directed by Andrew Levitas, tells the story of the legendary photo-journalist Eugene Smith and his wife Aileen Mioko Smith whose LIFE Magazine photos and book Minamata brought global attention to the devastating impacts of mercury pollution and exposed the corporate malfeasance of the Chisso Corporation that knowingly poured mercury-contaminated wastewater into Minamata Bay for decades. The film is an important opportunity to hold polluters accountable and to move global policy to more effectively curb mercury pollution.

IPEN and Arnika Press Release

Environmental Health Groups Celebrate the End to EU Allowance for Banned Flame Retardant Chemicals to Enter Recycling Streams & New Products

(Gothenburg, Sweden) The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. Researchers had revealed that across Europe, alarming levels of toxic banned flame retardants and related chemicals, which originated largely from discarded electronics equipment, were contaminating the recycling stream and new consumer goods made from recycled plastics. Environmental health advocates applaud the EU’s decision and encourage the six remaining countries with PBDE recycling exemptions to follow suit.

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