Spacer

 

Google Translate

IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Donate

Highlights Front Roll

Understanding the Connection between COVID-19 and Chemicals
Report Highlights Threats of Toxic Additives in Plastic
Holding Producers Responsible: Financing the Sound Management of Chemicals
Australia plastics waste ban highjacked by incineration proposals
IPEN Leader Speaks Against US Dumping Plastics and Chemicals in Africa
Study Reveals High Levels of Lead in Spray Paints
New Study Proves Dioxins in Plastic Toys Harm Children

The letter asks the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to rescind or replace its "free pass to pollute" policy allowing companies to suspend critical health and safety monitoring with no public disclosure during the coronavirus pandemic.The U.S. EPA and Congress should be working to protect communities and workers, not unnecessarily endangering them by making them more vulnerable to disease from toxic pollution in the middle of a global pandemic. 

For decades plastic producers have been manufacturing a lie about the recyclability of plastics to justify a toxic and unsustainable industry. The industry manipulation is revealed in an important documentary, Plastic Wars, a Frontline investigation from PBS and NPR. IPEN leader Yuyun Ismawati is featured in the exposé guiding the film crew through communities where a tsunami of plastic waste has been dumped in Indonesia. The images of plastic waste inundating streets and looming over people’s homes is the tip of the iceberg. International shipments of plastic waste from countries in the global north, including the US, EU, Australia and others, shipped and dumped in in the global south, are poisoning food sources and creating dangerous public health hazard. The recent report Plastic Waste Poison’s Indonesia’s Food Chain demonstrates how toxic plastics inundate food sources and imperil human health and the environment.

The Basel Ban Amendment forbids the export of hazardous waste for recycling or disposal from Annex VII countries (OECD Member States, EU Member States or Liechtenstein) to non-Annex VII countries (primarily developing and transition countries). The Ban Amendment benefits all countries. By prohibiting hazardous waste exports from developed countries, the Basel Ban Amendment helps protect developing and transition countries. For developed countries, the Basel Ban Amendment provides incentives for both waste prevention and green design. Currently, there is a large gap between the number of Basel Convention Parties (187) and number of Ban Amendment ratifications.

To address this issue and raise awareness about the importance of ratification, Basel Action Network and IPEN developed a Guide to the Ban Amendment entitled, The Entry Into Force of the Basel Ban Amendment: A guide to implications and next steps(available in English, español, français, hrvatski jezik and Русский).

IPEN Participating Organizations in Australia, Canada, Democratic Republic of Congo, Croatia, Republic of Korea, Mexico, Philippines, Russia, and Senegal also conducted activities to encourage governments to ratify the Ban Amendment. These activities and the Guide are part of IPEN's Toxics-Free Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Campaign, and relate to SDGs 3, 6, 8, 11, 12 and 13. Details about the activities can be found here.

EcoWaste Coalition and Greenpeace Philippines have released a new report "Waste Trade in the Philippines: How Local and Global Policy Instruments Can Stop the Tide of Foreign Waste Dumping in the Country". The report investigates the laws, the policies, and the shortfalls that have allowed illegal waste into the Philippines and also "legal" waste for which the country lacks an infrastructure capable of protecting the health of people and the environment.

Dr. Tadesse Amera, IPEN Co-Chair, welcoming participants to the meeting. To his left are Pamela Miller, IPEN-Co-Chair, and Björn Beeler, IPEN International Coordinator.

IPEN’s 2020 Global Meeting and Forum on Chemicals and Waste took place in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, from the 6th – 10th of February. More than 100 environmental, health and human rights leaders from over 50 countries came together to share the work they do locally and globally to ensure a just and healthy future for everyone by eliminating harm to human health and the environment from toxic chemicals.

IPEN’s new short video about women and chemicals honors many of the women environmental health scientists and advocates dedicated to a world in which toxic chemicals are no longer produced or used in ways that harm human health and the environment. The video makes the case that attention to the differential impacts of toxic substances on women and girls as well as the differential exposure risks is fundamental to effective and sound management of chemicals and waste. Please watch and share.

 

Alarming levels of some of the most toxic chemicals, including brominated dioxins and brominated flame retardants, were found in consumer products made of recycled plastics sold in Argentina, Brazil, Cambodia, Canada, the EU, India, Japan and Nigeria.

https://medium.com/@ToxicsFree/to-clean-up-canadas-recycling-act-end-a-z...

Giving hazardous material to children to play with, we can agree, is a terrible idea. But the Canadian government, by allowing some of the most toxic chemicals in the world to be included in recycling, has done just that. Dangerous flame-retardant chemicals, which have been banned globally, can be found in children’s toys and home products that are made of recycled plastics because of one bad policy.

Pages

Subscribe to IPEN RSS