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Chemicals in Products

Cry Game: Phthalates in Plastic Toys and Childcare Articles

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Safer Chemicals Alternative (ALHem) conducted analysis of the presence of banned or restricted phthalates in toys and childcare articles with the aim of raising public awareness on toy health safety in Serbia. The study is a part of a “CRY-GAME” outreach campaign supported by IPEN's Programme on Chemicals in Products “Raising Awareness on Health Impact of the Chemicals Used in Children Toys and Childcare products.”

The Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Regional Meeting for Asia Pacific was held from March 4th-8th, 2019 in Suzhou, China. 

IPENers from four different countries participated in the meeting representing the Asia Pacific region of IPEN.

Prior to the regional meeting, an IPEN preparatory meeting was held, along with an experience-sharing session with students from Duke University and fellow NGOs from China. This was organized by Shenzhen Zero Waste at Duke University, Kunshan, and took place on March 3rd.

http://sdg.iisd.org/news/report-recommends-lifecycle-approach-to-addressing-impacts-of-plastic-on-human-health/

The Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL) has released a report titled, ‘Plastic and Health: The Hidden Costs of a Plastic Planet,’ exploring human health impacts of plastic. The report concludes that each stage of the plastic lifecycle poses significant risks to human health on a global scale.

https://www.ctidoma.cz/zpravodajstvi/2019-02-27-v-bruselu-se-zblaznili-deti-budou-dale-vystaveny-chemikaliim-ktere

 

(note; this article is via Google translate from Czech to English, the link below is to the original article in Czech)

Press Release

(Prague, Brussels): The European Parliament and Council decision on the reform of the persistent organic pollutants (POPs) announced this week, hailed as protective for health, will cause more children to be exposed to hazardous flame-retardant chemicals associated with thyroid disruption and neurological deficits. The decision permits high levels of hazardous brominated flame retardants (PBDEs) that are in electronics waste, including those already banned by the Stockholm Convention, to be allowed in recycled plastics.  

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