Spacer

 

Google Translate

IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Chemicals in Products

13 June 2018

In Cameroon, plastic bottles, plastic bags, old rubber tyres, end of lives energy saving bulbs, and glass thermometers are frequently and carelessly dumped either on unused land or in water ways, with the risk of transportation to other waterbodies such as lakes or rivers. To eliminate this visual pollution, people living near these spontaneous dumping sites often turn to open burning of waste, with consequences for both ecosystems and human health.

Note:  Please go to our blog to see the photos of the products in question, as well as screen grabs of the online ads of the mercury-laden items bought and analyzed: http://ecowastecoalition.blogspot.com/2018/06/ecowaste-coalition-calls-out-e-commerce.html  Thank you very much for your kind attention, and best regards.

IPEN and affiliates have sent a letter to the SAICM Secretariat expressing concern with the joint International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) – UNEP study entitled “Knowledge management and information sharing for the sound management of chemicals.” The study was sent to SAICM stakeholders for comments to “inform the study.” The IPEN comments cover three areas: 1) important issues that are not part of the study; 2) issues that should be included in the study; and 3) concerns over UNEP’s private sector engagement.

Toxics Link has released a new report about microplastics in cosmetics. The report explains what microplastics are, how they end up in the environment, what their various impacts are (environmental, health, socio-economic, etc.), and alternatives to their use. 

PRESS RELEASE

Your facewash might be cleaning your face but polluting the environment!

IPEN Steering Committee Member Imogen Ingram from the Island Sustainability Alliance Cook Islands (ISACI) has co-authored an important paper about marine litter plastics and their toxic chemical components that has been published in Environmental Sciences Europe.

Photo: Lee Jin-man, AP

https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2018/03/14/your-cool-new-samsung-...

News media across the globe have been heaping praise on Samsung's cool new Galaxy S9 and S9+ smartphones. But amid all the raves about the tech innovations and fancy features of these devices, the lives of the mostly female workers who make them have been virtually ignored.

Few consumers or reporters are aware, for example, that half of all Samsung phones are manufactured in Vietnam by a female-majority workforce in their twenties.

Our organizations explored this hidden story by conducting in-depth, open-ended, confidential interviews with 45 women who work on the assembly lines at two Samsung factories in Vietnam. What we found was shocking.

EcoWaste Coalition
Unit 336, Eagle Court, 26 Matalino St., 1100 Quezon City, Philippines
Phone/Fax: 4411846E-Mail: info@ecowastecoalition.org
Website: http://ecowastecoalition.blogspot.com

News Release

Pages

Subscribe to Chemicals in Products