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A Toxics-Free Future

General

From Andrea Carmen, Executive Director of the International Indian Treaty Council:

Quezon City. After its protest action outside the Korean Embassy in Taguig City last November 15, the EcoWaste Coalition, an environmental  health and justice group, today  cheered the Korean government for confirming its commitment to take back the illegal garbage shipments languishing in Misamis Oriental.    

The “Embassy of the Republic of Korea would like to inform you the government has taken action on the recent controversy of waste imported  to the Philippines,” said the Embassy through an e-mail sent today to the EcoWaste Coalition.  

IPEN leaders Pam Miller (IPEN Co-Chair & Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics), Olga Speranskaya (IPEN Senior Advisor & Co-Director of Health and Environmental Justice Support International) and Joe DiGangi (IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor) have written a blog to contribute to the series: "How to create a gender-just healthy planet." 

http://gender-chemicals.org/category/blog-series-how-to-create-a-gender-...

A safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment is a human right. Exposure to hazardous substances and wastes undermines this right and puts women, children, and other vulnerable groups at risk of human rights abuses. Throughout their lives, women are exposed to numerous hazardous chemicals that can harm them and our future generations by transfer across the placenta during fetal development and through breast milk to the nursing infant.

Marine pollutants are impacting the health of our oceans, their inhabitants and those dependent on oceans for food, culture and their very survival. Everyday an ever-increasing cocktail of intentional and unintentional chemical releases, as well as an unrelenting tidal wave of wastes, particularly plastic waste, enters our waterways and the marine environment. This toxic threat endangers human health, marine life and the environment.

IPEN is pleased announce the release of the Ocean Pollutants Guide, as an initial step to raise awareness and bridge information gaps between ocean health, chemical safety, and emerging policy opportunities for action.

The IPEN Middle East & North Africa (MENA) regional newsletter (January - June 2018) shares news about different activities and projects of Participating Organizations (POs) in the region. Some of the projects were supported by IPEN. The newsletter aims to raise awareness about the different activities POs are working on, share information within the region, and exchange expertise. In this newsletter, information about incineration, plastics, Earth Day, lead in paint, the Minamata Convention, electronics, and government decisions on the environment are highlighted.

IPEN group unites in Kyrgyzstan for the EECCA Regional Meeting.

IPEN Regional Hub Eco-Accord, in cooperation with the Independent Ecological Expertise, an IPEN Participating Organization in Kyrgyzstan, successfully organized and hosted the EECCA regional workshop in Kyrgyzstan from August 26-29. The meeting was held in one of the most beautiful places, Lake Issyk-Kul, located in the Tian Shan Mountains. It is the second largest saline lake in the world, warm enough to swim in.

The team of 24 NGO representatives from countries in the EECCA region worked hard to strengthen and adopt a revised Regional NGO Strategy for the current period until 2030, with its intermediate assessment in 2020.

The programme of the meeting was quite comprehensive, but the team allocated enough time for a fruitful discussion, communicating many different perspectives and expertise on a range of topics. 

Roro Hills. Photo: Shweta Narayan.

Roro Hills, Jharkhand, India

Last week, India's National Green Tribunal (NGT) ordered quick remediation of 25,000 cubic meters of asbestos waste in a towering pile in the village of Roro in the State of Jharkhand.  

The waste was left there 35 years ago by asbestos mining company Hindustan Industries Ltd. 

This big victory follows work that began in 2012, when ELAW partner Shweta Narayan traveled to the site to collect soil samples that documented dangerous levels of asbestos exposure. Even small amounts of asbestos can cause severe health problems, including lung cancer.

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