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A Toxics-Free Future

General

Environmental Health News

https://www.ehn.org/plastic-pollution-and-human-health-2629322391.html

"Every stage of the plastic lifecycle poses significant risks to human health, and the majority of people worldwide are exposed to plastic at multiple stages of this lifecycle."

Press Release / Full Report / Executive Summary

Washington, DC—A new report released today reveals that plastic is a human health crisis hiding in plain sight. Plastic & Health: The Hidden Costs of a Plastic Planet, authored by the Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL), Earthworks, Global Alliance for Incinerator Alternatives (GAIA), Healthy Babies Bright Futures (HBBF), IPEN, Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services (t.e.j.a.s.), University of Exeter, and UPSTREAM, brings together research that exposes the distinct toxic risks plastic poses to human health at every stage of the plastic lifecycle, from extraction of fossil fuels, to consumer use, to disposal and beyond.

To date, research into the human health impacts of plastic have focused narrowly on specific moments in the plastic lifecycle, often on single products, processes, or exposure pathways. This approach fails to recognize that significant, complex, and intersecting human health impacts occur at every stage of the plastic lifecycle: from wellhead to refinery, from store shelves to human bodies, and from waste management to ongoing impacts of microplastics in the air, water, and soil. Plastic & Health presents the full panorama of human health impacts of plastic and counsels that any solution to the plastic crisis must address the full lifecycle.

According to the report, uncertainties and knowledge gaps often impede regulation and the ability of consumers, communities, and policymakers to make informed decisions. However, the full scale of health impacts throughout plastic’s lifecycle are overwhelming and warrant a precautionary approach. 

(Canadian and International NGOs Back EcoWaste Coalition’s Latest Push for PM Justin Trudeau to Resolve Canada’s Illegal Waste Dumping Controversy)

Quezon City, Philippines.  Canadian and international environmental, health and human rights organizations have taken up the cudgel for the EcoWaste Coalition in its latest bid to get the reeking garbage from Vancouver returned to its source. Canada illegally dumped the waste in the Philippines in 2013 - 2014. 

From Andrea Carmen, Executive Director of the International Indian Treaty Council:

Quezon City. After its protest action outside the Korean Embassy in Taguig City last November 15, the EcoWaste Coalition, an environmental  health and justice group, today  cheered the Korean government for confirming its commitment to take back the illegal garbage shipments languishing in Misamis Oriental.    

The “Embassy of the Republic of Korea would like to inform you the government has taken action on the recent controversy of waste imported  to the Philippines,” said the Embassy through an e-mail sent today to the EcoWaste Coalition.  

IPEN leaders Pam Miller (IPEN Co-Chair & Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics), Olga Speranskaya (IPEN Senior Advisor & Co-Director of Health and Environmental Justice Support International) and Joe DiGangi (IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor) have written a blog to contribute to the series: "How to create a gender-just healthy planet." 

http://gender-chemicals.org/category/blog-series-how-to-create-a-gender-...

A safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment is a human right. Exposure to hazardous substances and wastes undermines this right and puts women, children, and other vulnerable groups at risk of human rights abuses. Throughout their lives, women are exposed to numerous hazardous chemicals that can harm them and our future generations by transfer across the placenta during fetal development and through breast milk to the nursing infant.

Marine pollutants are impacting the health of our oceans, their inhabitants and those dependent on oceans for food, culture and their very survival. Everyday an ever-increasing cocktail of intentional and unintentional chemical releases, as well as an unrelenting tidal wave of wastes, particularly plastic waste, enters our waterways and the marine environment. This toxic threat endangers human health, marine life and the environment.

IPEN is pleased announce the release of the Ocean Pollutants Guide, as an initial step to raise awareness and bridge information gaps between ocean health, chemical safety, and emerging policy opportunities for action.

The IPEN Middle East & North Africa (MENA) regional newsletter (January - June 2018) shares news about different activities and projects of Participating Organizations (POs) in the region. Some of the projects were supported by IPEN. The newsletter aims to raise awareness about the different activities POs are working on, share information within the region, and exchange expertise. In this newsletter, information about incineration, plastics, Earth Day, lead in paint, the Minamata Convention, electronics, and government decisions on the environment are highlighted.

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