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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=8&v=Y55OPHSEdWE

For tens of thousands of people in Western Kenya, gold mining is a way of making a living.

On informal mines across the region, women use mercury to bring out the gold. But a recent study conducted by a network of international charities has found that the chemical could be slowly killing them - and affecting the wider community.

NYATIKE, Kenya (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Scorching sun beats down on half a dozen women as they carry large sacks of crushed ore on their backs at the Osiri-Matanda gold mine near Kenya’s border with Tanzania.

On wooden tables, they sieve the powdered ore into metal pans, add mercury, and heat the mixture over a charcoal fire. The air fills with fumes as the liquid metal evaporates - leaving behind a lump of gold. 

Many IPEN partners are featured in the new issue of the Women and Environments International Magazine on Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining: Women and Health.

Amongst other articles in the magazine, IPEN Co-Chair Olga Speranskaya writes about women leading the fight against the largest mining plant in Russia, the Tominsky MPP plant, owned by a Russian copper company. The company is currently destroying protected forests to clear land and build the mine. Activist scientists at the forefront of this movement describe a domino effect of environmental impacts that threaten to make the populated region uninhabitable.  

Click this link to read the issue: 

http://www.yorku.ca/weimag/CURRENTISSUE/index.html

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