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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Basel

The Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Regional Meeting for Asia Pacific was held from March 4th-8th, 2019 in Suzhou, China. 

IPENers from four different countries participated in the meeting representing the Asia Pacific region of IPEN.

Prior to the regional meeting, an IPEN preparatory meeting was held, along with an experience-sharing session with students from Duke University and fellow NGOs from China. This was organized by Shenzhen Zero Waste at Duke University, Kunshan, and took place on March 3rd.

Global Partnership for Action on Plastic Waste Also Proposed

Geneva.  6 September 2018.  The 11th Meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group of the Basel Convention, the world's only international treaty on waste control, concluded with widespread and growing support for a proposal by Norway to add plastic waste to the list of wastes subject to the trade controls under the convention. The proposal is seen as a key mechanism to stem the tide of marine debris and plastic litter.

A decision that will impact toxic waste dumping in developing countries, as well as the amount of Persistent Organic Pollutant (POPs) waste allowed in the circular economy, will be made by delegates from the Parties to the Basel Convention (Geneva, Sept. 3-7, 2018).

Threshold limit concentrations that define POPs waste – the most toxic form of waste that exists— determine whether a toxic substance is considered a POP and must be destroyed, or is considered “clean” and can re-enter the recycling stream. If a high level is set of one specific POP, Short Chained Chlorinated Paraffins (SCCPs), known to cause sever health and environmental impacts, it will result in increased hazardous waste dumping in developing countries and more contamination of products made of recycled materials, such as children’s toys.

https://www.ciel.org/plastic-waste-proposal-basel-convention/

Videos of plastic waves hitting pristine waters in Southeast Asia and the Caribbean shocked the world. Those images soon became viral, making us wonder: How did plastic end up there? How can we stop this?

A Norwegian proposal that aims to combat marine debris could close the door to certain export markets for U.S. recycling companies.

Norway in June introduced a proposal to amend the Basel Convention, which governs international movement of waste materials. The changes would reclassify scrap plastic under the category of “wastes requiring special consideration.” The Norwegian government cited the prevalence of marine plastic debris as the impetus for the proposal.

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