Spacer

 

Google Translate

IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Donate

industrial pollution

The letter asks the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to rescind or replace its "free pass to pollute" policy allowing companies to suspend critical health and safety monitoring with no public disclosure during the coronavirus pandemic.The U.S. EPA and Congress should be working to protect communities and workers, not unnecessarily endangering them by making them more vulnerable to disease from toxic pollution in the middle of a global pandemic. 

ZENICA/PRAGUE – Despite the highly toxic air in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), only limited data on levels of pollution is accessible to the public. The government is failing to meet its international obligations, as well as those under domestic law, and publish a transparent register of major polluters. People thus do not know who is really poisoning them and to what extent and cannot effectively enforce the necessary improvements.

https://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1367047/contaminated-eggs-found...

The government has been urged to make a serious effort to combat persistent organic pollutants (POPS), toxic byproducts from industrial processes, from damaging the environment after a recent study found unsafe levels of POPs in eggs collected near factories in Samut Sakhon and Khon Kaen.

IPEN Participating Organization Ecological Alert and Recovery-Thailand (EARTH), along with Chulalongkorn University, National Health Commission Office of Thailand, Kumamoto Gakuen University, and Collaboration Center for Minamata Disease Victims, organized a program and public conference from 9th-12th September, 2016 in Thailand. The program aimed to discuss lessons learned from the Minamata industrial disaster and how to apply those lessons for a sustainable society and environment.