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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

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Malaria

National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE) carried out this project in Uganda and it involved, among other things, a desk study and field work. The desk study revealed various aspects regarding the use of DDT in the country including where it was used, when it was used and why it was used. The field work involved moving from the office to visit different stakeholders to gather information on DDT and its use in Uganda. Data was collected from Kampala-based institutions, including:

The overall objective of this project was to reveal the ongoing proliferation of DDT pollution in manufacturing and use and cite important non-chemical alternatives to increase pressure for acting on this ongoing use in Uganda, one of the countries that have registered an acceptable purpose for DDT use within the Stockholm Convention.

The overall objective of this project was to reveal the ongoing proliferation of DDT pollution in manufacturing and use and cite important non-chemical alternatives to increase pressure for acting on this ongoing use in Mozambique, one of the countries that have registered an acceptable purpose for DDT use within the Stockholm Convention.

Déclaration sur l’utilisation du DDT dans la lutte contre le Paludisme en Afrique

La journée mondiale de lutte contre le paludisme, le 25 Avril 2016 est l’occasion encore une fois pour Pesticide Action Network (PAN) Africa de renouveler son soutien à la Convention de Stockholm et réaffirmer sa position contre l’utilisation du DDT dans la lutte contre le paludisme.

IPENers from Uganda Network on Toxic Free Malaria Control (UNETMAC) and Pesticide Action Network (PAN) North America are quoted in this recent article.

The Observer, 12 January, 2014

Malaria is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda, with an estimated average of 10.6 million malaria cases each year.

It is responsible for 30-50 per cent of all hospital outpatient visits, 35 per cent of hospital admissions and 9-14 per cent of all hospital deaths.