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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Stockholm Convention

Actualización del Informe Ciudadano sobre Contaminantes Orgánicos Persistentes en Argentina

Enhancing awareness and participation of local actors and general public on the implementation of the Stockholm Convention in Tanzania

IPEN and Arnika Press Release

Environmental Health Groups Celebrate the End to EU Allowance for Banned Flame Retardant Chemicals to Enter Recycling Streams & New Products

(Gothenburg, Sweden) The European Union (EU) has taken an important step towards cleaning up its recycling; it will no longer allow materials containing a class of toxic, globally banned flame retardants known as PBDEs to be recycled. Researchers had revealed that across Europe, alarming levels of toxic banned flame retardants and related chemicals, which originated largely from discarded electronics equipment, were contaminating the recycling stream and new consumer goods made from recycled plastics. Environmental health advocates applaud the EU’s decision and encourage the six remaining countries with PBDE recycling exemptions to follow suit.

IPEN has joined 15 public interest NGOs and networks in providing critical comments on the draft European Union (EU) law on PFOA and PFOA-related compounds. In a letter dated 4 December 2019, NGOs noted that the proposed limit for PFOA in consumer products is not protective and not consistent with updated scientific information on the extreme toxicity of PFOA.

https://news.bloombergenvironment.com/environment-and-energy/new-pfas-co...

PAT RIZZUTO, Reporter 


A United Nations committee’s recent recommendation to ban an entire group of persistent fluorochemicals will better protect communities, consumers, and workers, according to an international environmental organization. 



IPEN Press Release

PFHXs, Used as a Substitute for Banned PFOS and PFOA, Recommended for Global Ban

(Rome, Italy) An U.N. expert committee decided unanimously to recommend a complete global elimination for another toxic fluorinated “forever chemical.” Fluorinated chemicals are widespread pollutants threatening drinking water sources, public health and the occupational health of firefighters. They do not break down in the environment and accumulate in the bodies of wildlife and people. They are used in a wide variety of products, including firefighting foam, waterproofing of textiles, and food packaging, as well as other industrial and consumer applications. 

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