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A Toxics-Free Future

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Toxic Plastic

Read the full article by by Ellalyn De Vera-Ruiz in the Manila Bulletin

Groups under the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN) on Tuesday joined calls for transparency on hazardous chemicals used in plastic production amid the release of a global report identifying “substances of concern” in plastics.

Results of a second investigation on the contents of phthalic plasticizers in the yellow rubber ducky

Report by Toxics Free Corps, China, in Chinese: https://mp.weixin.qq.com/s/VU1uMImC6ABmZ8wr3szlKA

Study of plastic pollution of the recreational zone of the Kharkov River

In this newsletter (in Russian / на русском) from the Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asian (EECCA) region, IPEN Participating Organizations from Armenia, Kazakhstan, Russia, Moldova, Tajikistan, Ukraine and Uzbekistan shared results of their recent work. Results presented relate to issues such as the production and use of highly hazardous pesticides, waste incineration, the disposal of obsolete pesticides, and environmental pollution from plastic. The work of these organizations and others contributes to the implementation of the regional EECCA NGO Strategy for Chemical Safety for the period up to 2030.

A container full of imported plastic waste is inspected by the local environment office at the Batu Ampar port in Indonesia on June 15, 2019.
Photographer: Andaru/AFP via Getty Images

https://news.bloomberglaw.com/environment-and-energy/eu-moves-to-ban-cer...

The European Union plans to go further than an international treaty in restricting exports of plastic waste, potentially spelling problems for the bloc in dealing with hard-to-recycle material.

This project relates to Sustainable Development Goals #3, 6, 9, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15. Special thanks to IPEN's Eastern Europe, Caucasus, and Central Asia (EECCA) Regional Coordinator Dr. Olga Speranskaya and EECCA Regional Hub Eco-Accord for their important contributions to the development and finalization of the project.

Dr. Tadesse Amera, IPEN Co-Chair, welcoming participants to the meeting. To his left are Pamela Miller, IPEN-Co-Chair, and Björn Beeler, IPEN International Coordinator.

IPEN’s 2020 Global Meeting and Forum on Chemicals and Waste took place in Bishoftu, Ethiopia, from the 6th – 10th of February. More than 100 environmental, health and human rights leaders from over 50 countries came together to share the work they do locally and globally to ensure a just and healthy future for everyone by eliminating harm to human health and the environment from toxic chemicals.

https://www.bangkokpost.com/business/1840279/activists-decry-plastic-ban...

Bangkok Post

Increase in waste imports from China may mean no net decrease from government plan

The recent ban on single-use plastic bags at major retailers created a stir for consumers and businesses, with social media abuzz with workarounds such as shoppers using wheelbarrows and stockings to carry off their 7-Eleven hauls.

https://www.sixthtone.com/news/1005094/china-intensifies-campaign-agains...

Though experts describe the new policy as a “milestone,” they also believe encouraging the use of biodegradable plastics is equally damaging to the environment.

Li You

China plans to ban the production of certain single-use plastic items by the end of this year to curb the amount of waste clogging the country’s landfills and waterways.

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/12/19/world/asia/indonesia-dioxin-plastic-tofu.html

New York Times

The Indonesian government pushed back on an international study that found high levels of dioxin in a village where plastic is burned to produce tofu.

By Richard C. Paddock

 

IPEN’s Toxic Plastics video provides a quick and accessible overview about how toxic chemicals in plastics threaten human and environmental health throughout the plastic life-cycle, from petrochemical production through disposal. Most plastics are not recyclable, but new plastic products made from recycled plastics can contain a toxic soup of dangerous chemicals. Landfills leech toxic chemicals into soils and groundwater. Incineration creates toxic pollution, including dioxins. Exporting plastic waste is poisoning poor communities around the world. View and share the video in Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish, and then find IPEN research and reports for a deeper dive.

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