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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

POPs

Lafarge Cement Plant in Vito, Atotonilco de Tula, México

IPEN Participating Organization and Latin America Regional Hub, Red de Acción sobre Plaguicidas y Alternativas en México (RAPAM), sent a letter to United Nations Development Programme and Secretary of Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), the Mexican environmental authorities, to stop the use of obsolete POPs pesticides as an alternative fuel in cement kilns as a technology selected in a Glo

13 June 2018

In Cameroon, plastic bottles, plastic bags, old rubber tyres, end of lives energy saving bulbs, and glass thermometers are frequently and carelessly dumped either on unused land or in water ways, with the risk of transportation to other waterbodies such as lakes or rivers. To eliminate this visual pollution, people living near these spontaneous dumping sites often turn to open burning of waste, with consequences for both ecosystems and human health.

IPEN Co-Chair Pam Miller published this opinion piece on federal and state inaction on the public health crisis of PFAS contaminated drinking water in the Fairbanks Daily News Miner.

http://www.newsminer.com/opinion/community_perspectives/alaska-must-tack...

IPEN Steering Committee Member Imogen Ingram from the Island Sustainability Alliance Cook Islands (ISACI) has co-authored an important paper about marine litter plastics and their toxic chemical components that has been published in Environmental Sciences Europe.

The Czech environmental group Arnika is ringing alarm bells. According to the results of a recent study it conducted, some children’s toys and grooming accessories, such as hair brushes, sold in the EU contain toxic substances. Arnika’s Karolína Brabcová says this is an unfortunate side product of the drive to promote plastics recycling.

Listen on Czech Radio: http://www.radio.cz/en/section/panorama/the-downside-of-plastics-recycli...

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