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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

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DDT

Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) is an organo-chlorine that was synthesized in 1874, but its insecticidal properties were discovered in 1939. DDT was first used during World War II to combat malaria and typhus among civilians and troops. Subsequently it was used as an agricultural and household pesticide. DDT is currently listed in Annex B of the Stockholm Convention, with its production and/or use restricted for disease vector control purposes in accordance with related World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations and guidelines.

National Association of Professional Environmentalists (NAPE) carried out this project in Uganda and it involved, among other things, a desk study and field work. The desk study revealed various aspects regarding the use of DDT in the country including where it was used, when it was used and why it was used. The field work involved moving from the office to visit different stakeholders to gather information on DDT and its use in Uganda. Data was collected from Kampala-based institutions, including:

The overall objective of this project was to reveal the ongoing proliferation of DDT pollution in manufacturing and use and cite important non-chemical alternatives to increase pressure for acting on this ongoing use in Zambia, one of the countries that had registered an acceptable purpose for DDT use within the Stockholm Convention and is considering re-registering.

The overall objective of this project was to reveal the ongoing proliferation of DDT pollution in manufacturing and use and cite important non-chemical alternatives to increase pressure for acting on this ongoing use in Uganda, one of the countries that have registered an acceptable purpose for DDT use within the Stockholm Convention.

The overall objective of this project was to reveal the ongoing proliferation of DDT pollution in manufacturing and use and cite important non-chemical alternatives to increase pressure for acting on this ongoing use in Mozambique, one of the countries that have

As of 2010, 65% of Zambia's population was engaged in agriculture. 96% of this farming population is represented by small scale farmers and 4% by commercial farmers. Agriculture has been identified as the number one key driver of the economy. Unfortunately, though highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) are used within the agriculture sector, there is currently no official data on the volume of HHPs used. This report explores this point and others in a quest to get an overall picture of the use of HHPs and alternatives in Zambia.

This report gives an overview of the current situation of highly hazardous pesticides (HHPs) in Mozambique and describes the process, methodology and recommendations to develop a national strategy plan on HHPs. It was based on institutional and stakeholder’s engagement; consultation with community-based farmers and agrochemical suppliers; reports; workshops; data collection and field work survey.

This report relates to Sustainable Development Goals 2, 3, 6, 8, 12, 13, 14 and 15.

Agriculture in Ethiopia is the foundation of the country's economy. In an effort to increase production and productivity, the agriculture sector puts the use of inputs like pesticides and fertilizers as driving forces. The use of these inputs was introduced to  smallholder farmers in the 1960s through agricultural extension systems. Since then, the use of pesticides by smallholder farmers showed a steady growth. Currently, special emphasis given to agriculture investment and the development of the flower sector contributes a lot to the import and use of pesticides.

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