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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Lead in Paint

by Faye Leone, Content Editor, SDGs and 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (US)

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • NGOs in five countries studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network, and found lead levels as high as 100,000 ppm in the equipment paint.
  • The recommended limit by UNEP is 90 ppm.
  • IPEN is calling for lead paint bans to include industrial paint on outdoor equipment, not only decorative paint, to protect children's health.

Children’s playgrounds in Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines and Thailand commonly contain painted equipment with lead levels above 90 ppm, the recommended limit by UN Environment Program (UNEP). Organizations in each country studied playground equipment as part of their participation in the International Pollutants Elimination Network (IPEN), a group of NGOs working to prevent toxic chemicals from harming human health and the environment.

Quezon City.  The phase-out of all types of lead-containing paints in the Philippines is an excellent example of a successful chemical policy directive aimed at preventing and reducing children’s exposure to lead, a highly toxic substance, from paints.

Report shows paints being sold in Kenya in 2017 had dangerously high amounts of lead

Cameroon Has Already Banned Lead Paints

English version following

IPEN Press Release

Study Highlights Need for Comprehensive Lead Paint Regulations to Protect Children’s Health 

International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week of Action Observed in 40 Countries 

(Gothenburg, Sweden) Children’s playgrounds in Indonesia, Malaysia, Mexico, the Philippines, and Thailand have been revealed to contain painted equipment with lead levels above 90 ppm, the recommended limit by UN Environment Program. Playgrounds containing dangerously high levels of lead exceeding 10,000 ppm were discovered in four of the countries studied. The concerning data was released during the International Lead Poisoning Prevention Week  (October 20-26, 2019) spearheaded by the Global Alliance to Eliminate Lead Paint that is observing its 10th anniversary this year. Environmental health experts say the data underscores the ongoing need for strong lead paint bans that is inclusive not just of decorative paints, but all types of paint irrespective of use.

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