Spacer

 

Google Translate

IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

SDGs

IPEN's "Views of the SAICM 3rd Intersessional Meeting (IP3)” (中文, English, русский, español, français, العربية) document addresses issues that will be taken up at the IP3, including process considerations; an enabling framework; targets, indicators and milestones; governance; and more.

To read the document, and learn more about IPEN's activities at the 3rd Intersessional Meeting, please visit this page.

Highly Hazardous Pesticides (HHPs) are a threat to human health and the environment, with significant impacts on developing and transition countries. In 2015, more than 100 governments at the 4th International Conference on Chemicals Management agreed that HHPs were an issue of global concern and reached a consensus resolution to give priority to the promotion of agroecological alternatives in the process of implementing the strategy on HHPs developed by FAO-UNEP-WHO.[1] 

http://sdg.iisd.org/commentary/policy-briefs/sdg-knowledge-weekly-oceans...

This SDG Knowledge Weekly spotlights recent findings and platforms on SDG 14 (life below water). The brief also reviews a few items on decarbonization towards SDG 13 (climate action), which researchers note plays a key role in ocean-related challenges.

Campaign Activities

IPEN Participating Organizations (POs) around the world are carrying out activities related to the Toxics-Free SDGs Campaign. Started in 2018, these activities address themes such as agroecology, chemicals in products, endocrine disrupting chemicals, hazardous chemicals in the lifecycle of electronics, highly hazardous pesticides, lead in paint, women and chemicals, POPs, workplace right-to-know, and / or zero waste issues.

IPEN leaders Pam Miller (IPEN Co-Chair & Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics), Olga Speranskaya (IPEN Senior Advisor & Co-Director of Health and Environmental Justice Support International) and Joe DiGangi (IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor) have written a blog to contribute to the series: "How to create a gender-just healthy planet." 

http://gender-chemicals.org/category/blog-series-how-to-create-a-gender-...

A safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment is a human right. Exposure to hazardous substances and wastes undermines this right and puts women, children, and other vulnerable groups at risk of human rights abuses. Throughout their lives, women are exposed to numerous hazardous chemicals that can harm them and our future generations by transfer across the placenta during fetal development and through breast milk to the nursing infant.

Resources

The publications on this page offer information about chemicals and waste. The SDGs that the publications relate to are indicated underneath the titles. Please click on the titles to access the publications, and note that many of them are available in multiple languages.

Pages

Subscribe to SDGs