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India

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/delhi/truckloads-of-trouble-bio...
 
NEW DELHI: Ranjeet Kumar, a garbage collector, arrives early every morning at the garbage dump near Nangloi Railway Station. These days, he is chary about directly handling the trash in the dhalao there. For eight days now, he said, he has found biomedical waste packed in cardboard boxes dumped alongside the municipal waste at the dhalao.

After LG’s toxic release of styrene vapor into a nearby residential area killing and injuring people, the Andhra Pradesh State Government convened a High Power Committee (HPC) to investigate the tragedy.

Two months later, the HPC delivered a 4,000-page report sharply critical of LG’s management. The government investigation demonstrated LG’s disregard for safety, raised the possibility of a double standard in LG operations in South Korea and India and revealed significant environmental pollution caused by LG’s massive styrene release.

Read IPEN’s summary analysis of the HPC reportTimeline of the LG Tragedy

Key findings of the report include the following:

The National Green Tribunal (NGT) is the government legal body with expertise and jurisdiction over environmental matters. After LG's toxic release of styrene gas into a nearby residential area killing and injuring people, NGT convened an investigative committee.

Read IPEN’s summary and analysis of the NGT report | Timeline of the LG Tragedy

The NGT investigative committee delivered a critical final report on 28 May 2020 which concluded that LG’s “gross human failure” and the company’s lack of basic safety equipment and procedures caused the tragedy. The committee noted that, “The root cause thus appears to be the lack of experience of LG Polymers India and their Korean principal, LG Chem, in monitoring and maintaining full tanks of styrene that were idled for a long period of several weeks without operation.”

Key findings of the report include the following:

On the 35th anniversary of the poisoning disaster in Bhopal, India, where thousands of people were immediately killed and hundreds of thousands of people injured from exposure to a leak of methyl isocyanate and other gases, the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal (ICJB), Pesticide Action Network (PAN) and other organizations are demanding action:

Indian NGO Toxics Link released a new report on 20 September "Dirty Trail:

IPEN’s regional meeting for the South Asia Region was conducted from 17-19 April, 2019 in New Delhi, India. The three-day meeting with regional participating organizations (POs) was organized by Toxics Link, IPEN’s hub for South Asia Region. A total of 26 POs from Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal and Sri Lanka participated in the event.

This was the first of its kind meeting and was very crucial in bringing the POs together to have a better understanding of each other’s work.

Read the report

In 2018, Toxics Link prepared a Country Situation Report to examine into the following aspects, overall current management scenario of POPs, gaps in the regulations, major achievements and challenges of POPs management in the country, with an aim to provide a better road map for its management.

Read the report

Toxics Link has released a report detailing the lead content in paints in India for 2018. 

Roro Hills. Photo: Shweta Narayan.

Roro Hills, Jharkhand, India

Last week, India's National Green Tribunal (NGT) ordered quick remediation of 25,000 cubic meters of asbestos waste in a towering pile in the village of Roro in the State of Jharkhand.  

The waste was left there 35 years ago by asbestos mining company Hindustan Industries Ltd. 

This big victory follows work that began in 2012, when ELAW partner Shweta Narayan traveled to the site to collect soil samples that documented dangerous levels of asbestos exposure. Even small amounts of asbestos can cause severe health problems, including lung cancer.

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