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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

Waste

https://www.environewsnigeria.com/pave-collaborates-with-japan-unep-on-n...

Nigeria and Japan have undertaken a waste management initiative aimed at obtaining information of mercury emission and release from landfill facilities.

Ahead of a major survey scheduled to hold by January 2010, consultants, civil society organisations, government officials and representatives of the Japanese government have commenced moves to actualise the scheme.

русский, English, 中文, español, français, العربية

In the run-up to the Mercury Treaty's 3rd Conference of the Parties (COP3), which will take place in Switzerland from 25 - 29 November, 2019, IPEN has prepared three informative briefs related to contaminated sites; mercury waste thresholds and definitions; and dental amalgam and gold plating (review of Annex A (mercury-added products) and Annex B (processes using mercury).

These briefs provide information about why IPEN believes guidance on contaminated sites must be adopted at the COP3; why 1 mg/kg for mercury waste thresholds should be the maximum concentration for health and environment protections; and why IPEN suports amendments to Annex A and B of the treaty. 

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/14/world/asia/indonesia-tofu-dioxin-plas...

Plastic waste from America, collected for recycling, is shipped to Indonesia. Some is burned as fuel by tofu makers, producing deadly chemicals and contaminating food.

By Richard Paddock

TROPODO, Indonesia — Black smoke billows from smokestacks towering above the village. The smell of burning plastic fills the air. Patches of black ash cover the ground. It’s another day of making tofu.

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-50392807

The burning of plastic waste in Indonesia, much of which has been sent there by the West, is poisoning the food chain, the BBC has learned.

Environmental group IPEN found, in one East Java village, toxic dioxins in chicken eggs 70 times the level allowed by European safety standards.

Long-term exposure to the chemicals is linked to cancer, damage to the immune system and developmental issues.

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