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A Toxics-Free Future

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Health

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have received significant public and media attention in the US, EU, and Australia, in part due to their toxicity, extreme persistence, and documented water pollution. However, information about PFAS in other parts of the world is largely lacking and the information which is available is difficult to access.

Over the past few months, IPEN Participating Organizations in twelve Middle Eastern and Asian countries conducted surveys to explore possible PFAS uses and pollution sources, scientific studies and government actions, including under the Stockholm Convention. Countries covered include: Bangladesh, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Japan, Jordan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Thailand, and Vietnam.

An international group of 33 world-renowned scientists published today a peer-reviewed consensus statement on the impact of food contact chemicals on human health and recommended improvements of the assessment of chemicals in a health-protective way [1]. Civil society groups from Europe, the U.S.

Desde RAP-AL abogamos por un mundo libre de plaguicidas y la consecución de la soberanía alimentaria desde la producción agroecológica

Desde la Red de Acción en Plaguicidas y sus Alternativas de América Latina, una vez más, advertimos sobre la creciente utilización de plaguicidas en todo nuestro continente derivado tanto de la expansión de monocultivos insustentables cuanto de la permisividad de nuestros gobiernos que posibilitan el registro y comercialización de plaguicidas prohibidos en otros continentes, además de no realizar un control efectivo de su utilización.
 

IPEN Press Release

(Geneva, Switzerland): In a world first, the environmental treaty named after the devastating mercury pollution tragedy in Minamata, Japan, has just announced its decision to release global guidance on the clean up of mercury polluted sites.

After 4 years of hard negotiations and campaigning by IPEN, overcoming resistance from global powers such as the EU and the US, and with the steadfast support of the African region and many other countries, the Minamata Convention on Mercury has finally adopted official Contaminated Sites Guidance.

Today, at the opening session of the Mercury Treaty COP3, Mr. Koichiro Matsunaga, Minamata Disease Patient, addressed the delegates in plenary. In a moving statement, Mr. Matsunaga, who was exposed to mercury in the womb, reminded delegates of the real-life implications of mercury poisoning. Born in 1963, Mr. Matsunaga could not walk until 7 years old due to Minamata Disease. Despite his disabilities, he enjoyed riding bicycles, but in 2010, it became difficult for him to walk because of increasing pain, which forced him to live in a wheelchair. He stated, "Minamata disease is not over yet. Problems have not been solved yet. I do not want to see any more children suffer like us." He implored delegates: "Please take appropriate control of mercury for future children. I need the whole world to avoid causing any more tragedy by mercury."

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In the run-up to the Mercury Treaty's 3rd Conference of the Parties (COP3), which will take place in Switzerland from 25 - 29 November, 2019, IPEN has prepared three informative briefs related to contaminated sites; mercury waste thresholds and definitions; and dental amalgam and gold plating (review of Annex A (mercury-added products) and Annex B (processes using mercury).

These briefs provide information about why IPEN believes guidance on contaminated sites must be adopted at the COP3; why 1 mg/kg for mercury waste thresholds should be the maximum concentration for health and environment protections; and why IPEN suports amendments to Annex A and B of the treaty. 

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