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IPEN

A Toxics-Free Future

SAICM

Please note, one English version includes track changes. Tracking changes are used to signal text proposals for the Co-Chairs’ paper. This was done so that people did not think the document was unfinished. 

Read more about IPEN's vision for the future of chemical safety in our Perspectives for OEWG-3 here.

Learn more about IPEN's activities during the OEWG-3 here.

The Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM) will hold its 3rd Meeting of the Open-Ended Working Group (OEWG-3) from 2- 4 April, 2019 in Montevideo, Uruguay and IPEN will participate. SAICM is the only international agreement that addresses the full range of known and newly discovered health and environmental concerns associated with the production and use of chemicals. The 2006 decision that established SAICM expires in 2020 and now there is a global process (the "Beyond 2020" process) to determine what comes next.

The Beyond 2020 process has one required result: It must, “develop recommendations regarding measurable objectives in support of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.” In response, the IPEN Steering Committee adopted a one-page Toxics-Free Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) Pledge in October 2018 that explains actions for a toxics-free future that are essential for sustainable development. This reflects a series of papers on relevant Beyond 2020 topics developed by IPEN and the Pesticide Action Network (PAN) in 2017, including measurable objectives in support of Agenda 2030.

Campaign Activities

IPEN Participating Organizations (POs) around the world are carrying out activities related to the Toxics-Free SDGs Campaign. Started in 2018, these activities address agroecology, chemicals in products, endocrine disrupting chemicals, hazardous chemicals in the lifecycle of electronics, highly hazardous pesticides, lead in paint, women and chemicals, POPs, workplace right-to-know, and / or zero waste issues. Information about the activities listed below will be uploaded as it becomes availables. Please continue to check back! 

IPEN leaders Pam Miller (IPEN Co-Chair & Executive Director of Alaska Community Action on Toxics), Olga Speranskaya (IPEN Senior Advisor & Co-Director of Health and Environmental Justice Support International) and Joe DiGangi (IPEN Senior Science and Technical Advisor) have written a blog to contribute to the series: "How to create a gender-just healthy planet." 

http://gender-chemicals.org/category/blog-series-how-to-create-a-gender-...

A safe, clean, healthy and sustainable environment is a human right. Exposure to hazardous substances and wastes undermines this right and puts women, children, and other vulnerable groups at risk of human rights abuses. Throughout their lives, women are exposed to numerous hazardous chemicals that can harm them and our future generations by transfer across the placenta during fetal development and through breast milk to the nursing infant.

Resources

The publications on this page offer information about"hemicals and waste. The SDGs that the publications relate to are indicated underneath the titles. Please"lick on the titles to access the publications, and note that many of them are available in multiple languages.

The Pledge

IPEN has created a "Pledge" that outlines our vision of a world where chemicals and wastes are no longer a source of harm and where all people have the right to a safe and healthy environment, free from toxic threats to surrounding environments and to future generations. We invite public interest, non-profit, non-governmental civil society organizations to join the global campaign for a toxics-free future as an inherent part of sustainable development by endosing the Pledge.

http://www.setoghar.com/archives/45135/07/

सेतोघर संबाददाता / बिहिबार, साउन १०, २०७५

बालबालिकाको खेलौनाहरुमा उच्च स्तरमा हानिकारक रसायनहरु पाईएको छ । यसको लागि राष्ट्रिय मापदण्डको प्रभावकारी कार्यान्वयनको आवश्यकता देखिएको कारण यस सम्बन्धमा साउन ७ गते एक विशेष कार्यक्रम समेत गरिएको छ ।

http://epaper.thehimalayantimes.com/textview_9972_5327_4_1_2_24-07-2018_...

Kathmandu, July 23

 

High levels of toxic substances have been found in over 60 per cent of children's toys tested in the Nepali market.

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