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A Toxics-Free Future

Mercury

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In the run-up to the Basel Convention's 14th Conference of the Parties (COP14), IPEN worked with Basel Action Network (BAN) to complete a "Quick Views" document that addresses some issues that will be discussed at tthe COP14. These include marine litter and microplastics; financial resources; compliance; e-waste guidelines; POPs waste; technical guidelines on incineration, engineered landfill, hazardous waste physico-chemical treatment and biological treatment; and more.

The Views document can be read here and on IPEN's page for the Stockholm Convention's COP9, which has additional information about IPEN activities and publications related to the Basel and Rotterdam conferences.

Manila Bulletin, Philippines

https://news.mb.com.ph/2019/03/07/ecowaste-coalition-warns-public-against-mercury-laced-skin-whiteners/

 

In celebration of the International Women’s Day (March 8), an environmental group warned the public anew on the health hazards posed by mercury-laced skin whitening cosmetics used mostly by women.

This project and report sought to disseminate information about the risks of using mercury, as well as to identify the authorities’ responsibility to comply with international commitments such as the Minamata Convention. More specifically, the project aimed:

http://sdg.iisd.org/commentary/policy-briefs/sdg-knowledge-weekly-oceans...

This SDG Knowledge Weekly spotlights recent findings and platforms on SDG 14 (life below water). The brief also reviews a few items on decarbonization towards SDG 13 (climate action), which researchers note plays a key role in ocean-related challenges.

https://www.devex.com/news/opinion-defusing-the-toxic-timebomb-of-invisi...

Life on earth is utterly dependent on healthy oceans. They produce much of the oxygen we breathe, cycle the carbon dioxide, and regulate the weather we experience. Perhaps it is the vastness of the oceans that has made us complacent about its capacity to keep absorbing our toxic wastes?

After a year of global ocean meetings, the international community is finally facing up to the reality of polluted, depleted oceans.

Policies to protect the marine environment that do not address the finite nature of our world will fail.

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